Nearly there!

@the_famousproject @georgiaphoto

Nearly there!

Less than 500 miles to go for The Famous Project Limosa, ETA Portimao Tuesday

With around 500 nautical miles to sail to Portimao on Portugal’s Algarve coast where they will finish their Transatlantic passage from Antigua which they started on Saturday 15th April, the all girl The Famous Project crew on the MOD70 Limosa are in good spirits as they look forwards to the final miles.

This Sunday evening they are working their way east through the light winds in a wide high pressure ridge north east of the Azore, the light zone standing between them and the brisk N’ly trade winds off the Portuguese coast. Speeds have been around seven or eight knots. They are expecting to make Portimao on Tuesday.

Dee Caffari reported this evening, “The objective of the delivery was to manage the boat and the team safely. I think we have achieved that. We have tried to anticipate the wind and conditions and stayed one step ahead. Choosing a manageable sail plan that has allowed everyone a good amount of driving time and minimising stress. We headed north upwind for a couple of days to start with before we started to reach when the conditions eased. We then hoisted the gennaker and have enjoyed several days of downwind VMG sailing with boat speeds averaging 20knots day and night. We have now entered a transition phase 500 miles from the Portuguese coastline. We are waiting about the new breeze the other side coming from the north east. We should find this tonight about midnight and then we will be reaching for a while as the breeze fills and before we hoist the gennaker again for the final run into Portimao, arriving on Tuesday. So far all the crew are happy and the boat is in one piece so objectives are being met.”

@the_famousproject @georgiaphoto

Saturday as they passed north of the Azores, Georgia Schofield the on board media reporter wote, “We are making our way around the top of the Azores. There’s been an increase of birds flying around us and some fishing boats in the night. We’re too far away to see the islands themselves but it feels like they’re close. The boat is on a mission, it’s barely dropped below 17kn boat speed in the last few days, usually averaging 20-22 downwind. Life on board is pretty easy in these conditions, a stark contrast from the first two days (most of which I spent with my head in a bucket or sleeping).

The sunrises are the best time of day as we greet the sun earlier and earlier each day making it feel like we made good miles overnight.”